Book: Lights Out in Wonderland, DBC Pierre. This ed. Faber 2010.

 

Why?:  Gabriel comes out of the text to speak to the reader, telling me to pay attention, so I do, and I’m possibly with him more than I might normally have been, because he asked me to. And I can hear it, smell it feel it more than I might have done had he not asked me to. It’s post-modern, meta-fiction again, but I have a fondness for it so it’s allowed.

The master Limbo is in charge of all our lives, so you can take it as meaning not even the author is in charge here, anything could happen. It’s one of my favourite books at the moment. These two paragraphs are poetic, like grand speeches that escalate to a final conclusion. It’s just a lot of fun to read. Make sure you don’t miss this bit in the second paragraph:

…I watch a tourist liner glide past the window leaking mercury and gold across the gelatinous whorls of the Spree…

 

In fact most of the book is a wonderful, poetic escape.

 

 

…and in the burning of a cigarette his Mercedes appears flashing through the traffic.

Only Bettina is inside, hair drawn up inside a chauffeur’s cap, a vision so ravishing, so bold and modern, that I must pause at the door, my friend and call you in close: step up with me, hear the throaty hiss of a perfect turbine, smell leather mix with musk see this spotless maiden masquerade as a man, as a servant, toying with it, with us, flashing dimples and teeth and clear eyes, and admit with me:

The Master Limbo gets some things rather right.

 

p 211, ‘Lights Out in Wonderland’, DBC Pierre

 

…we’re quickly assigned a table with a prime view. I watch a tourist liner glide past the window leaking mercury and gold across the gelatinous whorls of the Spree, and here, under flattering light, over linen and silver, I find a plane of well-being where I must pause, my friend, and call you in. Step close to these glowing linens, this sparkling glassware, snuffle this scent of hot food and vaporous wine, turn your ear to this elegant chatter between pleasant minds, and admit with me:

The Master Limbo gets some things rather right.

 

P167, ‘Lights Out in Wonderland’, DBC Pierre.

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